It is often difficult for viewers to appreciate the time and energy that goes into making a seemingly simple natural history photograph. For the past two years I have been photographing the lives of Lasioglossum sweat bees that have been nesting on my driveway. These tiny bees, which are smaller than a grain of rice, are often bombarded by a variety of predators and parasites. This past May, A Beewolf (Philanthus gibbosus) (one of many in time) moved into the nesting aggregation and began to take prey. I…

It is tempting, when starting a new project, to rush around in a desperate attempt to cover all of the bases. Believe me, this is something that I know all too well having initiated a few projects over the past few years. However, I promised myself before beginning this odyssey to get to know North America’s native bees that I would take the scenic route. I have no real deadlines and no definite conclusion that I’m driving toward other than my desire to help others realize just how important our…

Last summer, as I walked up my gravel driveway to get the mail I noticed a flurry of activity around several very tiny holes on the hard-packed, clay embankment. I had seen the holes before, but assumed that they belonged to ants. In fact, I had photographed several Big-headed Ants (Pheidole sp) in the same spot during the summer before. However, to my delight, after close inspection, I noticed that the insects that I had noticed were actually Lasioglossum sweat bees.