It is often difficult for viewers to appreciate the time and energy that goes into making a seemingly simple natural history photograph. For the past two years I have been photographing the lives of Lasioglossum sweat bees that have been nesting on my driveway. These tiny bees, which are smaller than a grain of rice, are often bombarded by a variety of predators and parasites. This past May, A Beewolf (Philanthus gibbosus) (one of many in time) moved into the nesting aggregation and began to take prey. I…

A trip into the world of bees offers a glimpse into the extraordinary. Each day, from the flowers that you pass on your way into the office, to the fields, forests and bare patches of earth, life and death struggles for survival are taking place, the outcomes of which will ultimately affect our own lives. Take notice and take care of bees. Spray less. Mow less. Provide a little shelter. That would be a great start. Pictured: Metallic Green Bee (Augochlorella sp) on Bee Balm (Monarda didyma).

Last summer, as I walked up my gravel driveway to get the mail I noticed a flurry of activity around several very tiny holes on the hard-packed, clay embankment. I had seen the holes before, but assumed that they belonged to ants. In fact, I had photographed several Big-headed Ants (Pheidole sp) in the same spot during the summer before. However, to my delight, after close inspection, I noticed that the insects that I had noticed were actually Lasioglossum sweat bees.