It occurred to me this past week that one of the reasons that I’ve been having such a wonderful time photographing bees is because the process is a lot like a treasure hunt. While I often may have an idea of what I’m netting, there are many, many more times at this stage when I have no idea of the species that I’ve just captured until I peer –very excitedly– into the net. In part, the chance for new discoveries is due to the sheer number of species…

Andrena cornelli is a beautiful, finely structured mining bee that is associated with Rhododendrons in eastern North America. This is also one of the first species that I photographed in the summer of 2013 in Highlands, NC when I was first kicking around the idea of this project.  I photographed this male A. cornelli just this past week (April, 2014) in Pickens, South Carolina as it visited a Pinxter Azalea.

Long-horned Bee (Eucera sp), Chattanooga, TN, Spring 2014 © Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

My multi-year project celebrating North America’s native bees is officially underway! I spent the last few days photographing species found in and around Chattanooga, Tennessee including this incredibly cute Long-horned Bee (Eucera species…possibly E. atriventris or E. dubitata). Species in this genus are important pollinators of sunflowers, alfalfa and other crops. Species in this genus are solitary, ground-nesting bees.

My multi-year project celebrating North America’s native bees is officially underway! I spent the last few days photographing species found in and around Chattanooga, Tennessee including this incredibly cute Long-horned Bee (Eucera species…possibly E. atriventris or E. dubitata). Species in this genus are important pollinators of sunflowers, alfalfa and other crops. Species in this genus are solitary, ground-nesting bees.